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Gluteus Medius/Minimus Injury

The gluteus muscles make up the outer buttocks in the human body. These broad and strong muscles make activities such as running and jumping possible. The gluteus medius (located at the outer part of the hip) and minimus (located behind the gluteus medius) work to straighten the hip during activity and assist with outer movements of the hip, as well as to stabilize the pelvis. Gluteus tears cause chronic hip pain.

What causes it?

While gluteus tears can result from traumatic injuries, most are degenerative and caused by chronic inflammation from repetitive movements and overuse. They are sometimes associated with trochanteric bursitis.

How do you know you have it?

The primary symptoms of a gluteal tear include:

  • Pain in the hip and lower back that worsens with extended periods of sitting or standing
  • Buttock pain
  • Night pain (when lying on the affected side)
  • Development of a limp
  • Difficulty bearing weight

How we fix it

The OSI hip team is experienced in advanced techniques for the treatment of gluteus tears. We are here to listen, discuss your concerns, and work with you to develop an effective treatment plan. You may undergo the following to determine the best course of care:

  • Physical exam: Your doctor will begin with a thorough consultation to understand your symptoms and any factors contributing to your hip pain, followed by a full physical exam to locate the source of your pain and any activities that aggravate the condition.
  • Imaging tests: X-rays or an MRI may help in providing the final diagnosis on the gluteus tear.

Nonsurgical Treatment

Nonsurgical treatments for tears in the gluteus medius/minimus include:

  • Rest
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications
  • Physical therapy

Surgical Treatment

Surgical repair to reattach the torn gluteus muscle may be necessary for restoration of function. This surgery can often be performed arthroscopically. Postoperative recovery typically involves 6 weeks of restricted weight bearing (with assisted device) and 6 weeks in a hip brace.

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